Perkūnas, the Poet of Strength

Perkūnas, the Poet of Strength
Perkūnas, the Poet of Strength

Perkūnas, the Poet of Strength

Perkūnas, so the legends said, had a divided soul.  His mother came from a village that took great pride in the fighting skills of their women–they had once defeated an army of knights at the battle of Varend. His father had the blood of giants, it was said, and was reckoned the greatest fighter in the Land. It was believed that when they met there would be a battle that would be talked about for generations. Instead, they looked at each other and fell deeply and helpless in love. So the ballad singers sighed a little, sharpened their quills and wrote quite different songs instead.

Perkūnas was their oldest son and he was born with a strength, so the midwives said, beyond that of any mortal child. Yet with his strength there came a gentleness and kindness that made the other children in his village not fear him, but love him deeply. And he was their Champion, long before he became a chosen Champion of the Bard Queen.

Tales are told of how he shifted a great wagon, loaded with heavy logs, so that the hapless driver could be pulled from where he had fallen underneath. Another time, he broke the back of a man who had taken child slaves and used them cruelly. He carried no weapon beyond a simple staff, crowned with the head of a snarling bear, but that he rarely needed to use.

He had great physical strength, greater than either of his parents. But he also had their romantic souls and, as he grew to manhood, he became as famous for his poetry as for his great strength.

When the Bard Queen summoned him to tutor the Princess Flora, it was to teach her the power and beauty of words as well as to help her grow strong and brave.

You can also read this page as part of an online book here.

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